Mar 14


The marker to James Cooper’s Battery B, 1st Pennsylvania Light Artillery is one of the oldest on the Gettysburg Battlefield. The features on the original top of the monument have faded away, and a new stone will be re-engraved. This view was taken facing south at approximately 2:15 PM on Saturday, March 12, 2011.

The first monument to Captain James Cooper’s Battery B 1st Pennsylvania Artillery is being restored to its original condition. The cap on top of the monument, which had faded away over the years, will be re-engraved and replaced with a new stone.


The monument is located on East Cemetery Hill. The large monument on the right is a later monument to Cooper’s Battery. Culp’s Hill is in the left background. McKnight’s Hill/Stevens’ Knoll is in the center background. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 2:15 PM on Saturday, March 12, 2011.


The first monument was placed here circa August, 1880. The second larger monument to the battery was erected on September 11, 1889. This view was taken facing south at approximately 2:15 PM on Saturday, March 12, 2011.


One of the reasons that the top of the monument was removed was for safety reasons. The top/cap had been loosened from its base. This view was taken facing east at approximately 2:15 PM on Saturday, March 12, 2011.


Another reason that the cap was removed was so that the National Park Service could study it. Most of the original markings had faded away, and no single source listed all of the original markings. This view was taken facing east at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, July 5, 2009.


The estimated replacement cost is $12,000. All money raised will be held by the Pennsylvania Gettysburg Monuments Project until enough money has been raised to purchase and engrave the stone. This view was taken facing east at approximately 2:15 PM on Saturday, March 12, 2011.


The original total cost of the monument is not known. Reunion minutes record they raised $48 in 1880. This was after a year of inactivity because of lack of funds to pay the balance due on the shaft and erect it. The veterans still owed $2.40 for it a year later. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, July 5, 2009.


Cooper’s Battery was involved in an artillery duel with Confederate batteries located on Benner’s Hill on the afternoon of July 2, 1863. They were replaced by Rickett’s Pennsylvania Battery, the back of whose monument is shown here. To the left of the monument to Rickett’s Battery is the equestrian statue to Major General Oliver O. Howard. The distinctive Cemetery Hill water tank is in the left background. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 2:15 PM on Saturday, March 12, 2011.


Reunion minutes printed in the local newspaper describe an octagon marble shaft four feet high surmounted by nine inch crossed cannons in high relief. The monument to the 14th Indiana Infantry Regiment is on the right. The equestrian monument to Major General Winfield Scott Hancock is on the left. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 2:15 PM on Saturday, March 12, 2011.


The cap of the monument had eight sides or faces. Three faces were to be inscribed with battery particulars such as name, organization and discharge date. Two faces would list their engagements. The captains’ names were to be on the remaining three faces. The monument to the 14th Indiana Infantry Regiment is above the Cooper monument/marker. The equestrian monument to Major General Winfield Scott Hancock is on the left. The Evergreen Cemetery Gatehouse is on the far left. This image was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:15 AM on Sunday, February 7, 2010.


An early photograph of the monument shows corps badges for the First Corps and the Fifth Corps on the faces of the monument. These were not listed in description found in the original minutes. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 2:15 PM on Saturday, March 12, 2011.


The National Park Service has given the reenactors representing the battery, and the battery’s descendants permission to replace the monument with a similar one in a more durable stone. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, July 5, 2009.


The National Park Service staff believes that they have figured out the original configuration of the stone, and has sent a specification package for engraving and replacing the stone to Keith Foote. Mr. Foote is the point man for the project to raise funds for the monument. The 1889 monument to Cooper’s Battery is above the top of the four foot tall 1880 monument. The monument to the 4th Ohio Infantry Regiment is in the right background. This view was taken facing south at approximately 2:15 PM on Saturday, March 12, 2011.


This monument is the tenth monument placed at Gettysburg National Military Park, and the first artillery monument on the battlefield. This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, July 5, 2009.


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