Apr 30



Colonel Henry A. Barnum (1833-1892) of the 149th New York Infantry Regiment, received this wound in his left side (ilium) on July 1, 1862 at the Battle of Malvern Hill. At that time he was a Major in the 12th New York Infantry. This photograph shows how he was required to keep the wound free of infection. He is dragging an oakum rope through the wound. Barnum had to use this method of cleaning his wound during the Gettysburg Campaign. Barnum led his regiment during the Chattanooga Campaign when he was wounded in the forearm. His actions there earned him the Congressional Medal of Honor. The citation reads: “Although suffering severely from wounds, he led his regiment, inciting the men to greater action by word and example until again severely wounded.” He was wounded by a shell in his right side during the Atlanta Campaign. This photograph is courtesy of Charlie Fennell. This photograph was taken circa 1866.

Our Culp’s Hill series is led by Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Dr. Charles Fennell. Dr. Fennell received his Ph.D. in history from West Virginia University in 1992. His dissertation was titled, “The Battle of Culp’s Hill.” In our first post on Culp’s Hill, he began our tour at the summit, near the observation tower. In our second post he continued his walk around Culp’s Hill by discussing the position of the 60th New York Infantry Regiment. In our third post he looked at the earthworks in the area of the monuments to the 150th New York Infantry Regiment and the 78th and 102nd New York Infantry Regiments. In today’s post, Charlie shows us the monuments to the 149th and 137th New York Infantry Regiments, and discusses some of their actions.



This map will show the locations of the videos we will show on the tour. Videos #1-#3 were taken on the summit of Culp’s Hill near the observation tower. Videos #4-#7 were taken near the monument to the 60th New York Infantry Regiment. Videos #8-#10 were taken between the monuments to the 150th New York and the 78th/102nd New York Infantry Regiments. Videos #11-#12 were taken by the monument to the 149th New York Infantry Regiment. Video #13 was taken near the monument to the 137th New York Infantry Regiment. Video #14 was taken near the marker for the 84th New York (14th Brooklyn) Infantry Regiment. This map was created facing north at approximately 6:00 PM on Wednesday, April 29, 2009.



Dr. Charles Fennell is standing at the monument to the 149th New York Infantry Regiment. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 10:00 AM on Sunday, March 22, 2009.

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In Video #11 (Videos #s 1-10 were shown in the previous posts on Culp’s Hill), Charlie Fennell shows us some features of the monument to the 149th New York Infantry Regiment. The colors were struck 88 times during the fighting on Culp’s Hill.  Of course Charlie meant to say that they were struck 81 times through the cloth, and seven times through the staff. This view was taken facing northeast to northeast to east at approximately 10:00 AM on Sunday, March 22, 2009.



The bronze relief on the monument to the 149th New York Infantry Regiment which Charlie was showing us in Video #11. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 5:40 PM on Tuesday, April 15, 2008.

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In video #12, Charlie tells us the story of Colonel Henry Barnum, and points out some details on his picture. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 10:00 AM on Sunday, March 22, 2009.



Dr. Charles Fennell is now standing by the monument to the 137th New York Infantry Regiment. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 10:00 AM on Sunday, March 22, 2009.

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In video #13, Licensed Battlefield Guide Charlie Fennell explains how the 137th New York Infantry Regiment on the right flank of the Union line, compared to the 20th Maine Infantry on the left flank of the Union line. This view was taken facing northeast to east at approximately 10:00 AM on Sunday, March 22, 2009.



Dr. Fennell provided the statistics for this comparison between Vincent’s Brigade on Little Round Top vs. Greene’s Brigade on Culp’s Hill, and the 20th Maine vs. the 137th New York (access the pdf version by clicking here). This image was created at approximately 10:00 PM on Wednesday, April 29, 2009.



Charlie has now moved down the earthworks to the area where the 137th New York constructed a traverse. The traverse was a set of earthworks constructed at right angles to the main line of earthworks. Their purpose was to assist the soldiers in the main line of earthworks from being outflanked. The large monument in the background is the 7th Ohio Infantry Regiment. To its right is the monument to the 23rd Pennsylvania Infantry. To its right is the monument to the 67th New York Infantry Regiment. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 10:00 AM on Sunday, March 22, 2009.

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In video #14, Charlie Fennell explains where he believes that the traverse was constructed, and how long it might have been. This view was taken facing northwest to southeast at approximately 10:00 AM on Sunday, March 22, 2009.

To see other posts by Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guides, click here.


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