Oct 25
Henry H. Lockwood (August 17, 1814-December 7, 1899) was born in Kent County, Delaware, and graduated from West Point in 1836. He saw some service in the Seminole Wars, and in 1841 he was appointed Professor of Mathematics at the United States Naval Academy. In the Civil War, he entered service as the Colonel of the 1st Delaware Infantry Regiment, and later was made a Brigadier General of Volunteers in the defenses of Washington, D.C. He joined the Army of the Potomac during the Gettysburg Campaign in command of an Independent Brigade made up of two Maryland regiments and one New York regiment. For a time in 1864 he commanded a division in the 5th Corps. He resumed his career at the Naval Academy after the Civil War and commanded the United States Naval Observatory between 1870-76. He is buried at the Naval Academy in Annapolis, MD. This image was produced circa the 1860s and is courtesy of Richard Goedkoop.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Dr. Rich Goedkoop is the host for a series on Union Counterattacks on Cemetery Ridge During July 2, 1863. He is a professor of Communication at LaSalle University. Rich began his professional career in education as a Graduate Assistant at Central Michigan University. He received his Masters there in 1977 and went on to Pennsylvania State University to receive his Doctorate in 1980. Rich joined La Salle that same year. Throughout his career, Rich has taken an active interest in news and public affairs television programming which inspired his book, Inside Local Television News (1988). His numerous reviews and articles have appeared in such publications as Journalism Quarterly, The Journal of Broadcasting, Feedback, and Critical Studies in Mass Communication.

Dr. Goedkoop was the host for our series on John F. Kennedy’s visit to Gettysburg.

Dr. Goedkoop was also the host for our series on The Iron Brigade.

Rich Goedkoop writes, “I wish to thank LBG and close friend Cliff Detweiler, for research assistance on this series. I would also like to thank Mr. Dale Gallon and Ms. Anne Gallon of Gallon Historical Art, Gettysburg, PA (Gallon.com) for the gracious use of two of Dale Gallon’s paintings for illustrations of key moments of the First Minnesota at Gettysburg.”

To contact Richard Goedkoop, click here to reveal his email address.

In the first Union Counterattacks’ post, Rich Goedkoop introduces us to the Union Counterattacks’ series, and explains how Major General Sickles’ forward move on July 2, 1863 necessitated the counterattacks.

In the second Union Counterattacks’ post, LBG Rich Goedkoop shows us the monuments to the 39th New York, the 111th New York, and the 125th New York on the Gettysburg Battlefield.

In the third Union Counterattacks’ post, LBG Rich Goedkoop showed us the monument to the 126th New York and the markers for the positions of Willard’s Brigade and the site where Willard was killed.

In today’s Union Counterattacks’ post, LBG Rich Goedkoop shows us the monuments to the 150th New York and the 1st Maryland Potomac Home Brigade on Culp’s Hill, and where they attacked at the Trostle Farm on July 2, 1863.

This map shows the location of the videos for Union Counterattacks series. Videos #1-#10 were shown in our previous posts. Video #11 was taken at the monument to the 150th New York Infantry Regiment. Video #12 was taken at the monument to the 1st Maryland Potomac Home Brigade. Video #13 was taken at the Trostle Farm. This map was created facing north at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, October 21, 2011.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Goedkoop is standing on Culp’s Hill by the monument to the 150th New York Infantry Regiment. The monument to the 1st Maryland Eastern Shore Regiment (USA), also part of Lockwood’s Brigade, is in the left background. The 150th New York Infantry Regiment, or the “Duchess County Regiment,” was raised in Poughkeepsie, New York in August,1862. It soon left for service in the defenses of Baltimore and became part of the 8th Army Corps. It joined the Army of the Potomac in the field at Gettysburg with 609 men and became a part of an Independent Brigade attached to Brigadier General Alpheus Williams’ Twelfth Corps. At Gettysburg their commander is Colonel Henry Ketcham. In October, 1863 they are transferred to the 20th Corps and see action in the Atlanta Campaign of 1864 and then later in North Carolina until Joseph Johnston’s surrender in April,1865. This view was taken facing north at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.

In Video #11 (Videos #1-#10 were shown in our previous posts) Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Goedkoop is standing by the monument to the 150th New York Infantry Regiment. He provides some background on the regiment. This view was taken facing north to east at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Richard Goedkoop is showing that the nickname of the 150th New York is displayed on the west side of their monument on Culp’s Hill. The monument was dedicated on September 17, 1889. This view was taken facing east at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.
Colonel John Henry Ketcham (1832-1906) commanded the 150th New York Infantry Regiment at the Battle of Gettysburg. He served in the New York State Assembly and in the New York State Senate before the Civil War. He was promoted to the rank of brigadier general on April 1, 1865, and was brevetted major general on March 13, 1865. On March 4, 1865 he became a United States Congressman, and would serve in the House of Representatives for 33 years. This view was taken circa the 1860s and is courtesy of Richard Goedkoop.

Licensed Battlefield Guide Richard Goedkoop is standing by the monument to the 1st Maryland Regiment Potomac Home Brigade, Volunteer Infantry. It is located on the south end of lower Culp’s Hill. Spangler’s meadow is in the right background. This view was taken facing east at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.

In Video #12 Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Goedkoop is standing by the monument to the 1st Maryland Potomac Home Brigade Infantry Regiment, and provides background on the unit. This view was taken facing east to south to east to southeast to east at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.

Licensed Battlefield Guide Richard Goedkoop is standing by the monument to the 1st Maryland Regiment Potomac Home Brigade, Volunteer Infantry. He is showing the text on the monument that relates the regiment’s action on July 2, 1863. The monument was dedicated on October 25, 1888. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.

A closer view of the text on the monument to the 1st Maryland Potomac Home Brigade that explains their action on July 2, 1863. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.

The seal of the State of Maryland, shown on the monument to the 1st Maryland Potomac Home Brigade. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.

Richard Goedkoop is standing by the Abraham Trostle House. United States Avenue is in the foreground. This view was taken facing north at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.

In Video #13 Rich Goedkoop is in the area of the Trostle Farm. He shows how the two regiments of Lockwood’s Brigade advanced towards Confederates in this area on July 2, 1863. This view was taken facing east to north to northwest to southeast at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.

Richard Goedkoop is standing by the marker for the 150th New York Infantry Regiment. The Trostle Barn is in the left background. The Trostle House is out of sight on the right. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.
A view of the “back” side of the marker for the 150th New York at the Trostle Farm. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 4:00 PM on Wednesday, August 10, 2011.
The strengths and losses of the Union units that counterattacked the Confederates along Cemetery Ridge on July 2, 1863.
One of the best books regarding the action on July 2, 1863 at Gettysburg is a book by a former Gettysburg National Park Service Historian, Harry Pfanz. It is titled, Gettysburg: The Second Day.


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