Jul 26
Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher is the host for our series on the Texas Brigade. He is standing by the marker to Robertson’s Texas Brigade on South Confederate Avenue. This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher a native Pennsylvanian and a lifelong student of history. He is in his twelfth year as a Licensed Battlefield Guide. This is his fourteenth year teaching history at Harrisburg Area Community College in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. Dave has also been a Licensed Town Guide in Gettysburg for the last seven years. Dave attended Penn State and Indiana University of Pennsylvania and has earned two degrees (B.A. and M.A.) in history. Dave states, “I have always considered it a privilege to guide on this historic battlefield. I have a lot of fun doing it.” Dave is married to Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Kim Hamacher. They live in Red Lion, Pennsylvania.

To contact Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher, click here to reveal his e-mail address.

In today’s post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher introduces us to the Texas Brigade and provides background on their actions before the Battle of Gettysburg.

This map shows the location of where our the Texas Brigade videos were produced. Video #1 was taken by the Robertson Brigade Marker. Video #2 was taken by the Texas Brigade monument. Video #3 was taken by the Texas State Monument. Video #4 was taken by the Arkansas State Monument. Video #5 was taken across the street from the Arkansas State Monument, at the location of the Philip Snyder Farm. This map was created facing north at approximately 4:00 PM on Friday, July 22, 2011.
Brigadier General Jerome Bonaparte Robertson (1815-1890) commanded the Texas Brigade during the Gettysburg Campaign. He was a physician and a member of the Texas State legislature before the Civil War. He was colonel of the 5th Texas Regiment from June 1, 1862 until he was promoted to brigadier general, and commander of the Texas Brigade on November 1, 1862. This view was taken circa the 1860s.

In Video #1 Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher is standing by the Robertson’s Brigade plaque on South Confederate Avenue. He introduces us to himself and to the Texas Brigade. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.

A closer view of the Robertson’s Brigade marker. This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.

Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher is standing by the monument to the Texas Brigade on South Confederate Avenue. This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.

In Video #2 Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher is standing by the Texas Brigade Monument on South Confederate Avenue. He explains the early organization of the Texas Brigade and who were its first commanders. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.

A closer view of the Texas Brigade Monument which was erected in 1913. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.
Louis T. Wigfall (1816-1874) was the first commander of the Texas Brigade. He served as a member of the Texas Legislature, the United States Senate, and the Confederate States Senate.This view was taken circa the 1860s. It is courtesy of the Library of Congerss.
Lieutenant General John Bell Hood (1831-1879) was the second and most famous commander of the Texas Brigade. He was a West Point graduate (Class of 1853) and was a career army officer before the Civil War. He was appointed colonel of the 4th Texas Infantry Regiment on September 30, 1861. He commanded the Texas Brigade from February 20, 1862 until after the Seven Days Battles were completed in July, 1862. This view was taken circa the 1860s.
Brigadier General William Tatum Wofford (1824-1884) was the third commander of the Texas Brigade. He was an attorney, member of the Georgia state legislature, and a newspaper editor before the Civil War. He was appointed colonel of the 18th Georgia Infantry Regiment on April 25, 1861. The 18th Georgia joined the Texas Brigade in early 1862. As the senior colonel, Wofford commanded the Texas Brigade during the battles of Second Manassas, South Mountain, and Antietam. His regiment was then transferred to Thomas R. R. Cobb’s Brigade before the Battle of Fredericksburg. This view was taken circa the 1860s.
Brigadier General James Jay Archer (1817-1864) did not command the Texas Brigade, but he was a member of the brigade as colonel of the 5th Texas Infantry Regiment. He served as Colonel of the 5th Texas until June 3, 1862 when he was promoted to brigadier general, and given command of Robert Hatton’s Tennessee brigade. Hatton had been killed at the Battle of Seven Pines. He could command the brigade of Tennesseeans and Alabamians at the Battle of Gettysburg, where Archer was captured. This view was taken circa the 1860s.

Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher is standing by the Texas State Monument, which is located on South Confederate Avenue. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.

In Video #3 Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher is standing by the Texas State Monument. He informs us of the commanders of the Texas regiments before the Battle of Gettysburg.This view was taken facing east to west at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.

A closer view of the Texas State Monument which was erected in 1964. This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.
Colonel Philip Alexander Work (1832-1911) commanded the 1st Texas Infantry Regiment at the Battle of Gettysburg. He was an attorney before the Civil War. This view was taken circa the 1860s.
Colonel Robert M. Powell (1832-1911) commanded the 5th Texas Infantry Regiment at the Battle of Gettysburg. He was the first Captain of Company D of the 5th Texas untile he promoted to Major on August 22, 1862. He was promoted to the rank of Lieutenant Colonel eight days later, on August 30, 1862. He was promoted to Colonel of the 5th Texas in November, 1862. This view was taken circa the 1860s.

Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher is standing by the Arkansas State Monument, which is located on West Confederate Avenue. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.

In Video #4 Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher is standing by the Arkansas State Monument. He provides some background on the 3rd Arkansas Regiment before the Battle of Gettysburg. This view was taken facing east to west at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.

Licensed Battlefield Guide Dave Hamacher is pointing to the figure that looks like Abraham Lincoln being trampled by Arkansas soldiers on the Arkansas State Monument. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.
Colonel Vannoy Hartog “Van” Manning (1839-1892) commanded the 3rd Arkansas Infantry Regiment at the Battle of Gettysburg. He was an attorney before the Civil War. This view was taken circa the 1860s.

Dave Hamacher is standing on Seminary Ridge. West Confederate Avenue and the Arkansas State Monument are behind the cameraman. The Philip Snyder House is out of sight on the left. The Emmitsburg Road is behind Dave. The Emmitsburg Road is marked by the tops of some wooden fences. Big Round Top is in the right background. Little Round Top is in the left background. This view was taken facing east at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.

In Video #5 Dave Hamacher is standing on Seminary Ridge/Warfield Ridge near West Confederate Avenue. He gives us a “preview of coming attractions” by showing where Hood’s Brigade will attack on July 2, 1863, and showing how they were positioned before the attack. This view was taken facing east to south to southeast to east to south at approximately 5:00 PM on Friday, July 15, 2011.

To see other posts by Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guides, click here.


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