Daniel Sickles at Gettysburg

Daniel Sickles at Gettysburg

One of the most interesting individuals at the Battle of Gettysburg was United States Major-General Daniel Sickles. His movement to a position forward of the Army of the Potomac’s battle line on July 2, 1863, depending on your point of view, either saved the Union Army, or almost led to its destruction.
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Daniel Sickles
Daniel Sickles at Gettysburg Part 1
One of the most interesting individuals at the Battle of Gettysburg was United States Major-General Daniel Sickles. His movement to a position forward of the Army of the Potomac’s battle line on July 2, 1863, depending on your point of view, either saved the Union Army, or almost led to its destruction.
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Jim Hessler on Cemetery Ridge
Daniel Sickles at Gettysburg Part 2
In today’s post, we look at Sickles’ Gettysburg position near Cemetery Ridge before he made his move west to the Emmitsburg Road.
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Jim Hessler on Little Round Top
Daniel Sickles at Gettysburg Part 3
In today’s post, we look at Sickles’ movement to the line near the Peach Orchard and the Emmitsburg Road.
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Jim Hessler at the 2nd New Hampshire Infantry monument
Daniel Sickles at Gettysburg Part 4
In today’s post, we show General Meade’s reaction to Sickles’ move.
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Daniel Sickles
Daniel Sickles at Gettysburg Part 5
In today’s post, Jim describes Sickles’ wounding.
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Daniel Sheaffer Farm sign
Daniel Sickles at Gettysburg Part 6
In today’s post Jim visits the Daniel Sheaffer House on the Baltimore Pike where Sickles stayed the night following his wounding.
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Sickles at Gettysburg 1886
Daniel Sickles at Gettysburg Part 7
In today’s post, Jim describes Sickles preservation efforts, and gives his own view if Sickles was correct to move forward on July 2, 1863.
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