Gettysburg Artillery

George features a Napoleon manufactured by Quimby and Robinson in Memphis, Tennessee, a 20-pounder Parrott Rifle, manufactured by the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, New York, 24-pounder howitzers at Moody’s Battery, a 12-pounder howitzer (the oldest gun on the field), and 20-pounder Parrotts manufactured by the Tredegar Iron Works in Richmond, Virginia.
Downloadable Files
ZIPPart10HistoricImages.zip
ZIPPart11HistoricImages.zip
ZIPPart12HistoricImages.zip

Gettysburg Artillery Part 1
Licensed Battlefield Guide George Newton showed us some Gettysburg National Military Park artillery pieces last Sunday. He started with this Napoleon on Seminary Ridge near the North Carolina Monument, which was manufactured by Quimby and Robinson in Memphis, Tennessee.
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Gettysburg Artillery Part 2
This is the second part of our Artillery series with George. In Part 1, we featured a Napoleon manufactured by Quimby and Robinson in Memphis, Tennessee, and a 20-pounder Parrott Rifle, manufactured by the West Point Foundry in Cold Spring, New York.
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Gettysburg Artillery Part 3
In part three George shows the only 6-pounder displayed on the battlefield, and shows us how fifteen 6-pounders at Gettysburg National Military Park were converted into “false Napoleons.”
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Gettysburg Artillery Part 4
In today’s post, George Newton shows us the artillery pieces used on headquarters markers, and the two monuments on East Cemetery Hill to Cooper’s Battery B, 1st Pennsylvania.
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Gettysburg Artillery Part 5
In today’s post on East Cemetery Hill, George presents the highest numbered 3-inch Ordnance Rifle at Gettysburg National Military Park, and the positions of the artillery pieces today representing Cooper’s Battery and Rickett’s Battery.
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Gettysburg Artillery Part 6
In today’s post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide George Newton explains the advantages of 3-inch ordnance rifles, and the artillery bombardment involving East Cemetery Hill on July 2, 1863.
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Gettysburg Artillery Part 7
In today’s post, Licensed Battlefield Guide George Newton shows us the British-made Whitworths, and explains how they were loaded, and their advantages and disadvantages.
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Gettysburg Artillery Part 8
In today’s post, George Newton presents a 12-pounder Napoleon at Dilger’s Ohio Battery on West Howard Avenue.
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Gettysburg Artillery Part 9
In today’s post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide George Newton shows us limbers, caissons, and their proper positions when a battery was deployed on the battlefield.
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Gettysburg Artillery Part 10
In today’s post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide George Newton shows us the position of Battery B, 1st Rhode Island Light Artillery (Brown’s Battery) on July 2, 1863 and July 3, 1863.
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Gettysburg Artillery Part 11
In today’s post, Licensed Battlefield Guide George Newton described the actions of Cushing’s Battery A, Fourth U.S. Artillery on July 3, 1863.
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Gettysburg Artillery Part 12
In today’s post, George Newton described the actions of Andrew Cowan’s First New York Independent Light Artillery on July 3, 1863.
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