Mar 18



The headstone of Esaias Jesse Culp (1807-1861). The black fence in the background separates Evergreen Cemetery from the Soldiers National Cemetery. The large, light-colored monument is the Soldiers National Monument. This view was taken from the southwest facing northeast at approximately 4:30 PM on Tuesday March 18, 2008.

A small marker, hardly noticeable, sits in Section A, Lot Number 416 in Evergreen Cemetery, Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. It recognizes Esaias Jesse Culp, who died of “paralysis” on June 7, 1861. “Jesse” Culp, as he was commonly called in existing records, was the father of sons who served in opposite armies during the American Civil War. His son, William Culp, served in the United States Army with the 87th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment. His son, John Wesley Culp, served in the 2nd Virginia Infantry Regiment. The Gettysburg Daily took photographs of his marker as the rain began to fall on Tuesday afternoon.



The headstone was damaged by Confederate artillery fire during the Battle of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, July 1-3, 1863, and obviously has not been repaired. View from the southeast facing northwest at approximately 4:30 PM on Tuesday March 18, 2008.

Culp, Esaias Jesse Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident. (June 13, 1807- June 7, 1861) He was born in Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania.

“E. J. Culp” was shown on the 1854 membership roll for the Methodist Episcopal Church, Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania.

Gettysburg Circuit (Methodist) marriage records show that on July 22, 1859, Martha G. Creager of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania, married E. J. Culp of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania.

The 1860 census shows that Esaias Jesse Culp was “white,” a Tailor, and that he lived in the same dwelling and was part of the same family with his wife, Martha G. Creager Culp (1833-), born in Pennsylvania; Anna Eliza Culp (1835-), born in Pennsylvania; Julia A. Culp (1842-), born in Pennsylvania; Charles A. Culp (1860-), born in Pennsylvania.

His real estate had did not have a value, and his personal estate had a value of $225.

Esaias Jesse Culp (1807-1861) died of “Paralysis” on June 7, 1861 at the age of 53 years, 11 months, and 25 days. He was buried in Evergreen Cemetery, Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania on June 9, 1861 at 3:00 PM in Section A, Lot Number 416. The cost of his burial permit was $2.50.1

1 1860 Adams County, Pennsylvania Federal Census, Population Schedule p. 5/159; Hutchison, Glorianne “The United Methodist Church of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania Organized 1969 by the Merger of The First Methodist Episcopal Church (1815-1969) and The Memorial Evangelical United Brethren Church (1891-1969) both of Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania.” Typescript in the Adams County Historical Society. Pages 89, 98; Evergreen Cemetery, Gettysburg Pennsylvania Burial Permits Number 255



Jesse’s son, William, fought at the Second Battle of Winchester, Virginia on June 15, 1863. Approximately the same time that Jesse’s headstone was damaged, his son, Wesley, was killed. Conflicting sources have Wesley killed on either July 2nd or 3rd, and at either Benner’s Hill or Culp’s Hill. Culp’s Hill was owned by Jesse’s cousin, Henry. See Gettysburg Daily post for February 27, 2008. View from the northwest looking southeast at approximately 4:30 PM on Tuesday March 18, 2008.



Jesse Culp’s grave is located in the Myers’ section of Evergreen Cemetery because his daughter, Barbara, married a Myers. The red bricks of the National Park Service Electric Map Visitor Center is visible through the trees in the left of this picture. View is from the northeast facing southwest at approximately 4:30 PM on Tuesday March 18, 2008.



President Abraham Lincoln gave his Gettysburg Address on November 19, 1863 approximately 40 yards to the right or north of Jesse Culp’s grave. This view was taken from the southwest facing northeast at approximately 4:30 PM on Tuesday March 18, 2008.



The U.S. Army Regulars section of the National Cemetery, and a section for unknown soldiers in the National Cemetery are on the other side of the black fence and the sidewalk/road. The urn to the First Minnesota Regiment is visible in the right background. This view was taken from the southeast facing northwest at approximately 4:30 PM on Tuesday March 18, 2008.


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