Jan 10


The marker to Strong Vincent was erected on August 1, 1878 by the Strong Vincent Grand Army of the Republic (GAR) Post of Erie, Pennsylvania. The monument to the 12th and 44th New York Infantry Regiments is in the left background. This view was taken facing north at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.

Approximately three inches of snow fell in the Gettysburg area early Saturday morning. We decided that while we took our panorama pictures from Little Round Top, we would also take some photographs of a couple of the monuments.


We were not the first to arrive on Little Round Top, be we were the first… This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


…to take the middle path to the summit. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


So should we go down to the Warren Statue (note the footprints of the person who was here before us)… This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


… or go to the observation area at the top? This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


We’ll go down to the Warren Statue. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


Brigadier General Gouverneur K. Warren was the Chief Engineer of the Army of the Potomac during the Gettysburg Campaign. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


On the afternoon of July 2, 1863 he was at or near this rock when he saw Confederates forming to attack from Seminary Ridge/Warfield Ridge. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


Warren immediately began ordering/requesting troops to come to Little Round Top… This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


…and he has since been known as the “Hero of Little Round Top.” This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


We’ve walked back to the area where the wayside exhibits are located, and near the monument to the 91st Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 4:16 PM on Friday, November 24, 2010.


On the other (west) side of the 91st Pennsylvania Monument is where we stand to take our panorama pictures from Little Round Top. This view was taken facing west at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


These artillery pieces mark the location of Lieutenant Charles Hazlett’s Battery D, 5th United States Artillery. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


After Hazlett was mortally wounded here on July 2, 1863, his battery was commanded by Lieutenant Benjamin Rittenhouse. This view was taken facing south at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


We’ll walk down to the monument to the 44th New York Infantry Regiment (yes, we know the monument is also technically to the 12th New York). This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The monument to the 140th New York Infantry is on the left, and the monument to the 44th New York is on the right. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The monument to the 140th New York was erected in 1889. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The monument is in the area where Colonel Patrick O’Rorke was killed while leading his men to the southwestern slope of Little Round Top. This view was taken facing east at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


O’Rorke was shot through the neck and killed at or near this location. This view was taken facing east at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The 140th New York continued down the slope in this vicinity after O’Rorke was killed. Devil’s Den is in the middle distance. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The 140th New York was moving to the “shelf” of Little Round Top where the monument to the 16th Michigan is located. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


We will walk down to the area where the monument to the 16th Michigan is located. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The monument to the 12th and 44th New York was erected in 1893. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


We’re too wimpy to go straight down the snowy rocks towards the 16th Michigan, so we’ll walk around to take a path to that location, and also using the 44th New York as a reference point. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The 44th New York is the largest regimental monument at Gettysburg. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The monument was designed by Major General Daniel Butterfield, the original Colonel of the 12th New York and Meade’s Chief of Staff at Gettysburg. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


We’ve reached Sykes Avenue and the path that we wanted. This view was taken facing west at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The monument stands 44 feet high and 12 feet wide, dimensions that represent the two regiments that it memorializes. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


A spiral staircase inside the monument leads to a second floor observation deck. This view was taken facing north at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The marker documenting where Strong Vincent was mortally wounded is along this path. This view was taken facing west at approximately 4:16 PM on Friday, November 24, 2010.


The Vincent marker was oirginally oriented facing the opposite direction that it now faces. It was broken into two pieces by vandals in the 1970s. It was recut (a brand new marker) and rededicated in 1978 facing this direction. LBG Deb Novotny states that the original pieces were for a long time at Codori Memorials. This view was taken facing north at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


Although the monument to the 44th New York is on the top of Little Round Top, the main battle line of the regiment is marked by the stone walls constructed by the soldiers on the southern slope. The path continues to the left of the stone wall. This view was taken facing west at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


We’ve turned around to look at the way from which we came. The Vincent marker is in the center background at the end of the stone wall. This view was taken facing east at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


Now we’ve reached the shelf where the monument to the 16th Michigan is located. Devil’s Den is in the left background. Above Devil’s Den is Seminary Ridge/Warfield Ridge. This view was taken facing west at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


At Gettysburg, the 44th New York was first commanded by Colonel James C. Rice, who took over the brigade after Vincent was wounded, which left command of the regiment to Lieutenant Colonel Freeman Conner. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The 44th New York had 460 men present at Gettysburg. Casualties were 26 killed, 82 wounded, and three missing for 24%. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The monument to the 16th Michigan was dedicated in 1889. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


Below the monument and to the right is the area known as the “Slaughter Pen.” Above the Slaughter Pen is Devil’s Den. Devil’s Den is on the left of Houck’s Ridge. Above Houck’s Ridge, in the background at the distant treeline is Seminary Ridge/Warfield Ridge. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The 16th Michigan Infantry Regiment had 356 officers and men present at Gettysburg. Casualties were 23 killed, 34 wounded, and three missing for a total of 60 or 17%. This view was taken facing south at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


Big Round Top is in the left background. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The right of the regiment was outflanked by Texans in Robertson’s Brigade attacking towards the monument and the camera. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


When the monument was dedicated, it was not located on this rock. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.
It was originally located on flat ground approximately a dozen feet to the left of (southeast of) the rock… This view was taken facing southwest circa 1889.


…behind this stone wall. This view was taken facing east at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


The stone wall makes an angle as it runs towards Big Round Top. Warren Avenue is the snowy road in the right background. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 9:15 AM on Saturday, January 8, 2011.


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