Jun 2

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr is standing in Section 17 of Arlington National Cemetery by the grave of George Martin of the 6th U.S. Cavalry. This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, May 23, 2010.

Arlington National Cemetery, overlooking Washington, D.C., has many connections to Gettysburg and to the Gettysburg Campaign. There are many more connections than to only Robert E. Lee’s residence, and John F. Kennedy’s grave. Almost every row in the older sections have someone buried there who had a link to Gettysburg.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr shows us the individuals connected to Gettysburg who are buried at Arlington.

To contact Rich Kohr, click here to reveal his email address.

In our first Arlington post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr explains Robert E. Lee’s connection with Arlington, how the Union Army first occupied the site, and why Union Brigadier General General Montgomery C. Meigs established a National Cemetery at Arlington.

In our second post, Rich Kohr showed us the burial places of some of the first Union soldiers killed during the Gettysburg Campaign, and individuals such as John Gibbon and Hiram Berdan.

In our third Arlington post, some of the Gettysburg Campaign graves we saw included those of Ezra Carman, Roy Stone, and Abner Doubleday.

In our fourth Arlington post, we showed the graves of Gabriel Paul, Romeyn B. Ayres, J. Irvin Gregg, and Samuel Perry Lee, and James Jackson Purman.

In our fifth Arlington post we showed the graves of Lieutenant James Stewart of Battery B, 4th U.S., Colonel William Dudley of the 19th Indiana Infantry, Sergeant Frederick Fuger of Cushing’s Battery, and Colonel John Ramsey of the 8th New Jersey Infantry.

In our sixth Arlington post Rich Kohr presented the graves of Horatio Wright a division commander of the Sixth Corps, and Ellis Spear, Captain of the 20th Maine Infantry Regiment during the Gettysburg Campaign.

In our seventh Arlington National Cemetery post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr shows us the grave of Edward Whitaker, who carried the flag of truce to Confederate lines at Appomattox on April 9, 1865.

In our eighth Arlington National Cemetery post, Rich Kohr shows us the grave of military engineer Ira Spaulding, and two Chief of Staffs of the U.S. Army, Ira Chaffee and Samuel Young.

In our ninth Arlington National Cemetery presentation, Rich Kohr shows us the graves of Dr. Jonathan Letterman, Nelson Miles, Major Edmund Rice of the 19th Massachusetts, and Major General Daniel Sickles.

In our tenth Arlington post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr shows us the graves of the son of George Pickett, a Gettysburg Medal of Honor recipient, and the grandson of E.P. Alexander.

In the eleventh Arlington post, Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr showed us the graves of a tank trainer at Camp Colt, and a witness to both Pickett’s Charge and the charge up San Juan Hill.

In the twelfth Arlington post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr presented the gravesite of a Gettysburg Marine killed in Vietnam, an image of 1st Minnesota Veteran Albert Sieber, and the grave of a member of the 1st Michigan Infantry.

In the thirteenth Arlington post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr showed us the grave of Brigadier General Theordore Jonathan Wint, the Confederate Memorial and Confederate graves of those who had Gettysburg connections.

In today’s Arlington post, Rich Kohr shows us the grave of an individual awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor, James Longstreet’s sons, and “Gentle Annie,” Annie Etheridge Hooks.

This map shows us the locations taken of videos for our Gettysburg at Arlington series. Videos #1-#38 were shown in our previous Arlington posts. Video #39 was taken at the grave of Congressional Medal of Honor recipient George Martin. Video #40 was taken at the graves of of the sons of James Longstreet. Video $41 was taken at the grave of Annie Etheridge Hooks, who served with the 3rd Michigan Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg. This map was created facing north at approximately 2:30 PM on Sunday, May 30, 2010.

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In Video #39 (Videos #1 - #38 were shown in our previous Arlington posts) Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr shows us the grave of Gettysburg Medal of Honor recipient George Martin. This view was taken facing west to northwest to west at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, May 23, 2010.

The Congressional Medal of Honor was ordered to Martin Schwenk, as he was known during the Civil War on April 23, 1889. The citation reads, “Bravery in an attempt to carry a communication through the enemy’s lines; also rescued an officer from the hands of the enemy.” This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, May 23, 2010.

Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr is standing at the graves of the sons of Confederate Lieutenant General James Longstreet. Arlington’s Confederate Monument, within Jackson Circle, is shown in the background. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, May 23, 2010.

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In Video #40 Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr shows us the graves of the sons of Confederate Lieutenant General James Longstreet, both of whom served in the United States military. This view was taken facing northeast to northwest at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, May 23, 2010.

A question that needs to be asked regarding the relationship between Longstreet and his commander, Robert E. Lee. If Longstreet disagreed so much with Lee during and after the Gettysburg campaign, why did he name his son after Lee a month after the Battle of Gettysburg? This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, May 23, 2010.

Rich Kohr is standing in Section 15 of Arlington National Cemetery need the grave of “Gentle Annie,” Annie Etheridge, who served with the 3rd Michigan Infantry Regiment at Gettysburg. This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, May 23, 2010, 2010.

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In Video #41 Rich Kohr provides some background on Annie Etheridge, who during the Civil War served with three different Michigan regiments. This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, May 23, 2010, 2010./p>

Annie married James Etheridge on in 1860. He joined the 2nd Michigan Regiment in 1861 and Annie went with him. When he deserted following the Battle of First Bull Run, she stayed with the regiment until it was transferred to the western theater. She then joined the Third Michigan, and near the end of the war served with the 5th Michigan. She married Charles Hooks of the 7th Connecticut on March 1, 1870. This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:15 PM on Sunday, May 23, 2010, 2010.

To see other posts by Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guides, click here.


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