Feb 2

Our last visit to Arlington National Cemetery was at the end of September. This visit at the end of January saw a snowfall of approximately five inches. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 2:30 PM on Sunday, January 31, 2010.

Arlington National Cemetery, overlooking Washington, D.C., has many connections to Gettysburg and to the Gettysburg Campaign. There are many more connections than to only Robert E. Lee’s residence, and John F. Kennedy’s grave. Almost every row in the older sections have someone buried there who had a link to Gettysburg.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr shows us the individuals connected to Gettysburg who are buried at Arlington.

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In our first Arlington post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr explains Robert E. Lee’s connection with Arlington, how the Union Army first occupied the site, and why Union Brigadier General General Montgomery C. Meigs established a National Cemetery at Arlington.

In our second post, Rich Kohr showed us the burial places of some of the first Union soldiers killed during the Gettysburg Campaign, and individuals such as John Gibbon and Hiram Berdan.

In our third Arlington post, some of the Gettysburg Campaign graves we saw included those of Ezra Carman, Roy Stone, and Abner Doubleday.

In our fourth Arlington post, we showed the graves of Gabriel Paul, Romeyn B. Ayres, J. Irvin Gregg, and Samuel Perry Lee, and James Jackson Purman.

In our fifth Arlington post we showed the graves of Lieutenant James Stewart of Battery B, 4th U.S., Colonel William Dudley of the 19th Indiana Infantry, Sergeant Frederick Fuger of Cushing’s Battery, and Colonel John Ramsey of the 8th New Jersey Infantry.

In our sixth Arlington post Rich Kohr presented the graves of Horatio Wright a division commander of the Sixth Corps, and Ellis Spear, Captain of the 20th Maine Infantry Regiment during the Gettysburg Campaign.

In today’s Arlington National Cemetery post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr shows us the grave of Edward Whitaker, who carried the flag of truce to Confederate lines at Appomattox on April 9, 1865.

This map shows us the locations taken of videos for our Gettysburg at Arlington series. Videos #1-#18 were shown in our previous Arlington posts. Videos #19 and #20 were taken near McPherson Drive at the graves of Edward Whitaker and James Milton Pipes. Video #21 was taken at the graves of Jeremiah Williams and Llewellyn Estes. This map was created facing north at approximately 9:00 PM on Sunday, January 31, 2010.

Lieutenant Benjamin Rittenhouse (1839-1915) was a native of Berwick, Columbia County, Pennsylvania. He was a member of Battery D, 5th United States Artillery at the Battle of Gettysburg. This view was taken circa the 1870s.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr is standing by the grave of Benjamin F. Rittenhouse. Rittenhouse took command of Battery D, 5th U.S. on July 2, 1863 following the death of its commander, Charles Hazlett, on Little Round Top. Rittenhouse commanded the battery the rest of the battle, and retired from the United States Army as a Captain in 1874. This view was taken facing north at approximately 2:45 PM on Sunday, January 31, 2010.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr is standing by the marker of Edward Washburn Whitaker, who was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor while serving as Captain of Company E, 1st Connecticut Volunteer Cavalry at Reams Station, Virginia, June 29, 1864. The citation reads “while acting as an aide, he voluntarily carried dispatches from the commanding general to General Meade, forcing his way with a single troop of Cavalry through an Infantry Division of the enemy in the most distinguished manner, through he lost half of his escort.” His daughter, Grace Darling Seibold, was the founder of the American Gold Star Mothers, a group consisting solely of mothers whose sons had lost their lives in military service. Their purpose is not only comforting each other, but giving loving care to hospitalized veterans confined in government hospitals far from home. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:45 PM on Sunday, January 31, 2010.

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In Video #19 (Videos #1 - #18 were shown in our previous Arlington posts) Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr is standing near the monument to Edward Whitaker, who fought in Gettysburg’s South Cavalry Field, and who carried the flag of truce at Appomattox Court House, Virginia on April 9, 1865. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:45 PM on Sunday, January 31, 2010.

Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr is standing by the marker to James Milton Pipes who as a member of the 140th Pennsylvania Infantry Regiment, was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for his actions in “the Wheatfield” on July 2, 1863. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:45 PM on Sunday, January 31, 2010.

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In Video #20 Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr explains that action performed by James Milton Pipes that led to his being awarded the Medal of Honor. The citation reads, “While a sergeant and retiring with his company before the rapid advance of the enemy at Gettysburg, he and a companion stopped and carried to a place of safety a wounded and helpless comrade; in this act both he and his companion were severely wounded. A year later, at Reams Station, Virginia, while commanding a skirmish line, voluntarily assisted in checking a flank movement of the enemy, and while so doing was severely wounded, suffering the loss of an arm.” This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:45 PM on Sunday, January 31, 2010.

Rich Kohr is standing between the markers to two Gettysburg figures. On the left is Jeremiah Williams, and on the right is Llewellyn Estes. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 2:45 PM on Sunday, January 31, 2010.

Lieutenant Colonel Jeremiah Williams of the 25th Ohio Infantry Regiment (11th Corps) was captured at Gettysburg on July 1, 1863. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:45 PM on Sunday, January 31, 2010.

Llewellyn Estes was on the staff of Judson Kilpatrick at Gettysburg. He was awarded the Congressional Medal of Honor for actions on August 30, 1864, when he “Voluntarily led troops in a charge over a burning bridge.” This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 2:45 PM on Sunday, January 31, 2010.

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In Video #21 Rich Kohr provides some information on Jeremiah Williams and Llewellyn Estes. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 2:45 PM on Sunday, January 31, 2010.

To see other posts by Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guides, click here.


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