Oct 13



Arcadia was the Robert McGill home during the American Civil War. Major-General George Gordon Meade, commander of the Fifth Corps, Army of the Potomac, was informed on the grounds of this house that he was ordered to command the Army of the Potomac. This view, courtesy of the Maryland Historical Trust, was taken facing northwest at an unknown date.

United States Major General George Gordon Meade was the commander of the Fifth Corps of the Army of the Potomac on June 27, 1863. By 3:00 AM on June 28, 1863, he was ordered to command the Army of the Potomac.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Jim Hueting shows us the Frederick, Maryland area locations where Meade was informed he was to command the Army of the Potomac, and where he and Colonel James A. Hardie visited Major General Joseph Hooker to inform him of the change of command.

Jim Hueting began to study Gettysburg following a visit there at the age of five. Jim states, “after 56 years I would have to acknowledge that what I know could be placed in a thimble and roll around like a BB in a boxcar.”

Jim received his Bachelors degree from the Shenandoah Conservatory of Music, and his Masters Degree from Western Maryland College (now McDaniel College).  He also has 36 credits beyond his masters from Western Maryland and the University of Maryland.

Jim Hueting became a Licensed Battlefield Guide in 1987 and was President of the Association of Licensed Battlefield Guides from 2003-2004. Jim states, “I still believe the Association of Licensed Battlefield Guides is the best way to improve the quality of Licensed Guides through continuing education and common goals.”

To contact Jim, click here to reveal his email address.



This map shows the Frederick, Maryland area locations of the videos for the Meade Receives Command of the Army of the Potomac posts. Videos #1 and #2 were taken near Maryland Route 85, near the location of Arcadia. Video #3 was taken on the grounds of Prospect Hall. This map was created facing north at approximately 6:00 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Jim Hueting is the host for our Meade Receives Command series. This former Frederick County, Maryland music educator is standing west of Maryland Route 85, the Ballenger Pike. The fields behind him were occupied by the Army of the Potomac’s Fifth Corps on June 27th and 28th, 1863. In the background are the buildings of…This view was taken facing south at approximately 2:20 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



Arcadia, where Major General George Gordon Meade was camped when informed he now commanded the Army of the Potomac. This view was taken facing south at approximately 2:20 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.

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In Video #1 Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Jim Hueting is standing approximately three miles south of Frederick, Maryland. He describes the area where Major General George Gordon Meade had his headquarters on June 27th and 28th, 1863. This view was taken facing south to southeast to south at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



Arcadia played host to other Civil War officers. During the September, 1862 Antietam Campaign Confederate Colonel (later General) William Pendleton stayed at Arcadia. During the September, 1864 Battle of Monocacy, Confederate General Jubal Early formed his troops at Arcadia. This view was taken facing south at approximately 2:20 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



One of the primary advantages of having the Fifth Corps camp in this area was not only was it on a main road to Frederick, it is also in the area of the water source of Ballenger Creek. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:20 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



Licnesed Battlefield Guide Jim Hueting how now moved south of Ballenger Creek near the property line of Arcadia. This view was taken facing south at approximately 2:20 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.

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In Video #2 Licensed Battlefield Guide Jim Hueting is standing near the northern property line of Arcadia. He describes the meeting between Colonel James A. Hardie and Major General George Gordon Meade when Meade was informed he was now commander of the Army of the Potomac. This view was taken facing south to southwest at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



Arcadia is a 45-room mansion, situated on a hill overlooking the Monocacy Battlefield and dominating the surrounding landscape. Victorian additions and renovations over many years have obscured the original house, reportedly built around 1790. The Queen Anne tower was added after the Civil War. This view was taken facing south at approximately 2:20 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



This is one of two barns and five outbuildings on the Arcadia estate. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:20 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



Jim Hueting has now moved closer to Frederick to Prospect Hall, which is now the campus of St. John’s Catholic Prep School. St. Johns will move to a new campus near Buckeystown, Maryland in 2010. This view was taken facing north at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.

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In Video #3 Jim Hueting is standing on the campus of Prospect Hall, near the intersection of Interstate 270 and US Highways 15 and 340. This view was taken facing north to northwest to north at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



Built in 1803 on the highest elevation in Frederick City, Prospect Hall has hosted visitors from the Marquis de Lafayette to Harry Truman. It was the site of a Confederate camp during the 1862 Antietam Campaign. It was the location of General Joseph Hooker’s Headquarters when his resignation was accepted and George Gordon Meade assumed command of the Army of the Potomac. It was the site of a Confederate hospital following the Battle of Monocacy in 1864. This view, courtesy of the Historical Society of Frederick County, was taken facing north.



A monument to George Gordon Meade and some waysides is located southeast of Prospect Hall, which is in the background. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



The front of the monument mistakenly states that he took command at Prospect Hall. Of course he received command at Arcadia. This view was taken facing north at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



The east side of the monument has an interesting plaque. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



The south side of the monument also has a plaque. This view was taken facing east at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



This view was taken facing east at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



The back of the monument does not have any plaques. This view was taken facing south at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



There are two waysides behind the monument. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



The left wayside describes the change of command from Hooker to Meade. This view was taken facing east at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



A closer view of the wayside. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



The right wayside describes Maryland’s involvement in the Gettysburg Campaign. This view was taken facing east at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.



A closer view of the overview wayside. This view was taken facing east at approximately 2:40 PM on Sunday, October 11, 2009.

To see other posts by Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guides, click here.


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