Oct 28

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr is standing on the slope (front lawn) of the Custis-Lee Mansion (Arlington House). He is standing between the graves of Ezra Carman of the 13th New Jersey and Henry Van Ness Boynton of the 35th Ohio (The father of Chickamauga-Chattanooga National Military Park). The obelisk monument on the right is to Confederate and later United States General Joseph Wheeler. This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

Arlington National Cemetery, overlooking Washington, D.C., has many connections to Gettysburg and to the Gettysburg Campaign. There are many more connections than to only Robert E. Lee’s residence, and John F. Kennedy’s grave. Almost every row in the older sections have someone buried there who had a link to Gettysburg.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr shows us the individuals connected to Gettysburg who are buried at Arlington.

To contact Rich Kohr, click here to reveal his email address.

In our first Arlington post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr explains Robert E. Lee’s connection with Arlington, how the Union Army first occupied the site, and why Union Brigadier General General Montgomery C. Meigs established a National Cemetery at Arlington.

In our second post, Rich Kohr showed us the burial places of some of the first Union soldiers killed during the Gettysburg Campaign, and individuals such as John Gibbon and Hiram Berdan.

In today’s post, some of the Gettysburg Campaign graves we see include those of Ezra Carman, Roy Stone, and Abner Doubleday.

This map shows us the locations taken of videos for our Gettysburg at Arlington series. Video #1, was taken southeast of the Arlington House. Video #2 was taken in front of (east of) the Custis-Lee Mansion. Video #3 was taken behind (southwest of) the Custis-Lee Mansion near the grave of Brigadier-General Montgomery C. Meigs. Video #4 was taken south of Mary Lee’s rose garden, at the graves of two members of the 1st Maine Cavalry Regiment. Video #5 was taken on the eastern slope of the grounds of Arlington at the graves of John Gibbon and Julius Stahel. Video #6 was taken at the graves of Wheelock Veazey and Hiram Berdan. Video #7 was taken the near the graves of Ezra Carman, Henry Van Ness Boynton, and Joseph Wheeler. Video #8 was taken near the graves of Roy Stone and John R. Brooke. Video #9 was taken near the grave of Abner Doubleday. This map was created facing north at approximately 9:00 PM on Saturday, October 3, 2009.

The large obelisk monument on the left is to Joe Wheeler. The graves of Ezra Carman and Henry V. Boynton are on the right of this picture. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

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In Video #7 (Videos #1 - #6 were shown in our previous Arlington posts) Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr is standing near the headstone of Ezra Carman (12th New Jersey), Henry V. Boynton (35th Ohio/Chickamauga), and Joseph Wheeler (CSA Western Theater). This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

When Ezra Carman of the 12th New Jersey died of Pneumonia on Christmas Day, 1909, he was Chairman of the Chickamauga National Military Park Commission. This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

Buried next to Carman is his predecessor as Chairman of the Gettysburg National Military Park Comission, Henry Van Ness Boynton. This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

Another individual buried in this area with Gettysburg connections is John Miller Carson of the 27th Pennsylvania. Following the war he became a newspaper editor for papers in Philadelphia, Washington, and New York City. He is most famous for being a founder of the Gridiron Club, the oldest and most prestigious journalistic organization in Washington, D.C. This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

Lieutenant-Colonel John L. McGee of the 3rd West Virginia Cavalry was captured at Winchester, Virginia with General Milroy at the beginning of the Gettysburg Campaign. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

The 12th New Jersey Infantry Regiment fought at the Bliss Farm and around the Bryan Farm. This view was taken facing west at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr has now moved by his favorite monument at Arlington National Cemetery. It marks the grave of Pennsylvania Bucktails’ Colonel (later Brigadier General) Roy Stone. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

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In Video #8 Licensed Battlefield Guide Rich Kohr is standing near the monument/headstone of Bucktails’ Colonel Roy Stone. He also shows us the grave marker of Colonel John R. Brooke, whose brigade as part of Caldwell’s Division of the 2nd Corps fought in the area of the Wheatfield and the Rose Farm. This view was taken facing southwest to southeast at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

Stone was severely wounded in the hip and arm in the fighting on McPherson’s Ridge on July 1, 1863. This view was taken facing south at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

The palm genus Roystonea is named in memory of the work he did in road building in Puerto Rico. This view was taken facing east at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

John Rutter Brooke was severely wounded in the fighting around the Gettysburg’s Wheatfield on July 2, 1863. H recovered in time to fight in the Overland Campaign of 1864 and he was severely wounded again at Cold Harbor in June, 1864. This view was taken facing north at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

Also in the area of Stone’s and Brooke’s graves is the grave of Theodore Dodge. As First Lieutenant and Adjutant of the 119th New York Infantry Regiment, he was severely wounded in the leg at the Battle of Gettysburg, resulting in its amputation. He was later a prominent military author. This view was taken facing north at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

Also in this area is the grave of Colonel Clinton MacDougall of the 111th New York Infantry, which also fought in the area of the Bryan Farm on July 3, 1863. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

At the beginning of Pickett’s Charge, MacDougall was wounded in the left arm by a sharpshooter/skirmisher. The projectile severed the lower bone of his left arm. Following the war, MacDougall served in the United States Congress. This view was taken facing north at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

Rich Kohr has moved behind (southwest of) the Arlington House to the grave of Major General Abner Doubleday. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

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In Video #9 Rich Kohr is standing behind the Custis-Lee Mansion at the burial plot for Major General Abner Doubleday. Rich mistakenly said that Frank Newton took over the First Corps on July 2, 1863. Of course he meant John Newton. This view was taken facing northeast to north at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

Doubleday actually has a significant sized plot at Arlington. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

Abner Doubleday’s headstone. This view was taken facing north at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

The headstone Abner Doubleday’s wife, Mary Hewitt Doubleday (1823-1907). She was living with Abner at Fort Moultrie, South Carolina when the garrison was ordered to row across Charleston Harbor and to occupy Fort Sumter on December 26, 1860. She returned to Washington, D.C. and had her permanent residence at Willard’s Hotel for three years. The Doubledays were married in 1852. They did not have any children. This view was taken facing north at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

The north side of the monument. Across the street is the Arlington Chapel. While laying in state in New York City’s City Hall, Doubleday’s casket was covered by “the old flag of Moultrie.” This view was taken facing south at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

A closer view of the north side of the monument. This view was taken facing south at approximately 3:30 PM on Sunday, September 27, 2009.

To see other posts by Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guides, click here.


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