Mar 3



At the base of the Virginia Monument are figures representing the occupations of those who became Confederate soldiers from the Old Dominion. This view was taken facing west at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.

On Monday, March 2, 2009, an unexpectedly heavy snow storm arrived in Gettysburg which ended up shutting down the local schools. We took this opportunity to take some photographs and a video of the Virginia Monument on Seminary Ridge. We also presented some Virginia statistics. Remember that in 1860, Virginia also included what is now West Virginia.

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In this video we took a walk around the Virginia monument. Notice how the snow was blowing sideways and how hard the wind was blowing. This view was taken facing northeast to southeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



We’ll begin our walk at the rear of the monument looking from Seminary Ridge to Cemetery Hill and Cemetery Ridge. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia entered the Union on June 25, 1788, as the 10th state. This view was taken facing east at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia seceded from the Union on April 17, 1861. It was the 8th state to secede. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia was readmitted to the Union on January 26, 1870. It was the 8th of 11 states to be readmitted following the Civil War. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia’s state motto is Sic semper tyrannis. This phrase is Latin for “Thus ever to tyrants” This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



According to the 1860 Federal Population Census, Virginia’ population was 1,596,318. This number ranked Virginia as the fifth most populous state and was five percent of the total population of the United States in 1860 (31,443,321). This view was taken facing north at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



The 1860 “black” population in Virginia, according to the federal population census, was 455,443. This number was 29% of the total Virginia population in 1860 (1,596,318). This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia’s 1860 “mulatto” population, according to the federal population census, was 93,464. This was six percent of the total Virginia population in 1860 (1,596,318). This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia’s 1860 American Indian population, according to the federal population census, was 112 or .0001% of the total Virginia population in 1860 (1,596,318). This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia’s 1860 “white” population, according to the federal population census, was 1,047,299. This figure was 66% of the total Virginia population in 1860 (1,596,318). This view was taken facing west at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia’s 1860 slave population, according to the federal population census, was 490,865. This number was 31% of the total Virginia population in 1860 (1,596,318). This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia’s 1860 “free black” population, according to the federal population census was 34,557. This figure was eight percent of the “black” Virginia population in 1860 (455,443). This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia’s 1860 “free mulatto” population, according to the federal population census, was 23,485. This number was 25% of the “mulatto” Virginia population in 1860 (93,464). This view was taken facing south at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



The total economic wealth of Virginia in 1860, according to the federal population census, was $1,083,184,678. This was six percent of the total economic value of the United States of America in 1860: $19,089,156,287. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia’s personal estate value in 1860 (including slaves), according to the federal population census, was $588,286,351. This number was 54% of total economic value in Virginia: $1,083,184,678. This figure was also seven percent of the personal estate value of the United States of America: $8,158,736,030. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia’s real estate value in 1860, according to the federal population census, was $494,898,327. This figure was 46% of total economic value in Virginia: $1,083,184,678. This number was also five percent of the real estate value of the United States of America: $10,930,420,259. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



The average (per capita) economic wealth in Virginia in 1860 was $678.55. This number was 112% of the average (per capita) economic wealth of the United States of America: $607.10. This view was taken facing east at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Since we’re behind (west of) the monument, we thought we’d show you West Confederate Avenue before it was plowed. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



We featured these Virginia soldiers in our post on March 23, 2008. Today we will look at some of the military units in which they fought at Gettysburg, as we give you a closeup of these statues. The statistics we are showing you come from John Busey and David Martin’s Regimental Strengths and Losses at Gettysburg. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



These statues were cast by Tiffany & Co. in New York City. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Twelve states had Confederate military units at the Battle of Gettysburg. Virginia supplied the most troops with 20,776. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia suffered 4800 total casualties which ranked them second behind North Carolina (6582). This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Percentage-wise, Virginia rank 12th (last) of the states whose troops served at Gettysburg. Their casualties were 23.1% of the number of soldiers engaged. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia had 1012 soldiers “killed” at the Battle of Gettysburg. This ranked them second in the Army of Northern Virginia behind North Carolina (1452). This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Percentage-wise, Virginia had 4.9% of its soldiers killed during the Battle of Gettysburg. This ranked Virginia 10th of the states who had military units in the Army of Northern Virginia. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia had 2373 soldiers wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg. This placed Virginia second, behind North Carolina’s 3471 wounded soldiers, among states that had military units in the Army of Northern Virginia. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Percentage-wise, Virginia had 11.4% of its soldiers wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg. This ranked Virginia 12th (last) of the states who had military units in the Army of Northern Virginia. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Virginia had 1415 soldiers captured/missing during the Battle of Gettysburg. This placed Virginia second, behind North Carolina’s 1659 captured/missing soldiers, among states that had military units in the Army of Northern Virginia. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Percentage-wise, Virginia had 6.8% of its soldiers wounded during the Battle of Gettysburg. This ranked Virginia seventh of the states who had military units in the Army of Northern Virginia. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



General Robert Edward Lee was born on January 19, 1807 at Stratford Hall, Westmoreland County, Virginia. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



In 1829, Lee graduated second in his class at the United States Military Academy, West Point, New York. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Lee was appointed a full General in the Confederate States Army on June 14, 1861. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.



Robert E. Lee died in Lexington, Virginia on October 12, 1870. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Monday, March 2, 2009.

See the following related posts:

Sunday Morning at the Virginia Monument on March 23, 2008.


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