Sep 6



The Vermont State Monument at Gettysburg National Military Park was the first of the large state monuments to be erected on the battlefield. It was dedicated on October 9, 1889. This view was taken from the southwest facing northeast at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.

The Vermont State Monument at Gettysburg National Military Park is located on the east side of Hancock Avenue along Cemetery Ridge. The Vermont Monument was the first large state monument erected on the battlefield, and was dedicated on October 9, 1889. These photographs were taken as the rains from Tropical Storm Hannah began to reach the area.



The monument cost $11,750 in 1889. It is made of granite and standard bronze. The column is 55′ high, and statue of Brigadier General George Jerrison Stannard is 11′ high. This view was taken from the west facing east at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



The statue of General Stannard was sculpted by Karl Gerhardt. This statue is probably the greenest on the battlefield at this time with patina. This view was taken from the west facing east at approximately 5:40 PM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



The statue depicts Stannard missing his right arm. Although he was wounded by an explosion of an artillery shell at Gettysburg on July 3rd, he did not lose his arm here. He lost his arm on September 29, 1864 in the Battle of Fort Harrison, near Petersburg, Virginia. This view was taken from the west facing east at approximately 5:40 PM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



The monument is located where Stannard’s Second Vermont Brigade performed very well on July 3, 1863. They were attached to the Third Division of the First Army Corps. This view was taken from the northwest facing southeast at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



During Pickett’s Charge (Longstreet’s Assault), Virginians advanced toward the Vermonters from the distant woodline on Seminary Ridge. When near the Codori Barn, the Confederates changed direction and instead of charging from west to east, turned to attack from the southwest to the northeast, or from left to right in this photograph. This view was taken from the east facing west at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



Two of the Vermont Regiments, the 13th and the 16th were faced north. The Vermont Monument is on the left. The 13th Vermont was marched from right to left and faced north in this field. The 16th Vermont later extended the line to the left or west. The Confederates were attacking the area around the Copse of Trees of Clump of Trees (the dark green clump of trees to the left of the US Regulars Monument, which looks like a small Washington Monument) in the distance. The Vermonters now advanced from south to north, and hit the Virginians in their right flank and rear. This view was taken from the south facing north at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



After damaging the Confederates near the Copse of Trees area, the Vermont Regiments turned completely around and advanced on a “small rebel column” of Alabamians and Floridians advancing from right to left across the fields in the distance, and the 16th and 14th Vermont Regiments drove them back. This view was taken from the northeast facing southwest at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



Of course, the story of Stanndard’s Brigade is interesting because the members of the 13th, 14th, and 16th Vermont had only signed up to serve for nine months. They would be mustered out on August 10, 1863. These men fought remarkably well for “short-timers.” Of the 1980 men enaged at Gettysburg, the brigade lost 45 men killed, 274 wounded, and 32 missing or captured. The total loss of 351 men was 18%. This view was taken from the southeast facing northwest at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



The front or west side of the Vermont State Monument contains a bas relief carving of the state’s coat of arms. This view was taken from the west facing east at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



The south side of the monument describes the contributions of Lewis Grant’s First Vermont Brigade at Gettysburg. This view was taken from the south facing north at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



The east side of the monument describes the actions of the First Vermont Cavalry and of the Vermonters in Hiram Berdan’s Sharpshooter regiments. This view was taken from the east facing west at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



The north side of the monument describes the actions of Stannard’s brigade. This view was taken from the north facing south at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



The War Department marker to Stannard’s Brigade is also in the area… This view was taken from the west facing east at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.



… it is located to the southwest of the Vermont State Monument. This view was taken from the southwest facing northeast at approximately 8:40 AM on Saturday, September 6, 2008.


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