Aug 10



This “witness tree” near the Taneytown Road entrance to the Soldiers National Cemetery was heavily damaged by a storm Thursday evening, August 7th. This view was taken from the east facing west at approximately 2:15 PM on Sunday, August 10, 2008.

A “Witness Tree” to the Battle of Gettysburg was damaged by a storm Thursday night (August 7th). Approximately 70% of the Honey Locust was blown off the top of the tree. According to National Park Service officials, the tree might not be able to be saved.

See our previous posts on Gettysburg Witness Trees on April 30, 2008 and May 27, 2008.

See our later posts on Gettysburg Witness Trees on August 12, 2008, August 16, 2008August 27, 2008, and September 8, 2008.



When visitors enter the Taneytown Road entrance to the National Cemetery, the tree is straight ahead of them. The three people in the right background are looking at the damage on the tree. Various news sources are reporting that the tree fell 150 feet from where Lincoln gave his Gettysburg Address. Of course, this is probably because they don’t know where Lincoln gave his address. If they think it was near the platform on the left, then 150 feet is too close. If they feel that it is where the monument describing the address to the right of this view, and out of sight, that would be closer to 150 feet. However, since it was approximately 300 yards to the left or north of the tree, 900 feet would be closer to the actual distance. This view was taken from the west facing east at approximately 2:15 PM on Sunday, August 10, 2008.



Most of the damage occurred in the upper part of the tree. This view was taken from the west facing east at approximately 2:15 PM on Sunday, August 10, 2008.



Although the damage occurred Thursday night, most of the tree that was damaged, has still not been removed. This view was taken from the southwest facing northeast at approximately 2:15 PM on Sunday, August 10, 2008.



The tree is very close to the iron fence that separates the Soldiers National Cemetery on the left from the Evergreen Cemetery (civilian cemetery) on the right. This view was taken from the south facing north at approximately 2:15 PM on Sunday, August 10, 2008.



National Park Service officials believe that because so much damage was done, the tree might not be able to be saved. This view was taken from the northwest facing southeast at approximately 2:15 PM on Sunday, August 10, 2008.



The trunk of the tree is one of the widest on the battlefield. This view was taken from the southwest facing northeast at approximately 2:15 PM on Sunday, August 10, 2008.


About Us  •  Support  •  Archives  •  Subscribe  •  Creative Commons License