Mar 6



Gettysburg Railroad Station. View is from the northwest facing southeast at approximately 2:45 PM on Thursday, March 6th, 2008.

Built in 1859, the Gettysburg Railroad Station underwent major restoration and renovation in 2006. According to the 1860 federal census, the following individuals were listed as working for railroads:

Benner, Henry (1831-) (Ticket Agent) (White) Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident in 1860
McCurdy, Robert (1814-) (President) (White) Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident in 1860



Gettysburg Railroad Station. View is from the west facing east at approximately 2:45 PM on Thursday, March 6th, 2008.

Benner, Henry Straban Township, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident. (circa 1831-) He was born in Pennsylvania and lived in the same dwelling and was part of the same family with Christian Benner (1805-), born in Pennsylvania; Susannah Benner (1807-), born in Pennsylvania; Simon C. Benner (1841-1864), born in Pennsylvania; Oliver Benner (1844-), born in Pennsylvania; Julia Ann S. Benner Walter (1837-), born in Pennsylvania; Henry Benner Walter (1859-1865), born in Pennsylvania.

McCurdy, Robert Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident. Born circa 1814 in Pennsylvania. He lived in the same dwelling and was part of the same family with Mary J. McCurdy, born circa 1825; Anna C. McCurdy, born circa 1847; Mary M. McCurdy, born circa 1849; Charles M. McCurdy, born circa 1853; Elizabeth McCurdy, born circa 1855; Helen C. McCurdy, born circa 1857; his daughter Infant R. McCurdy (1860); Lucy Irvin, born circa 1820; William H. Irvin, born circa 1860. His Real Estate had a value of $23,000 ($425,500 in 2000 $ US) and his Personal Estate had a value of $3500 ($64,750 in 2000 $ US).

His daughter, Infant R. McCurdy, died in 1860 from “Congestion of the Lungs” at the age of 7 weeks and 5 days. His son, William McCurdy died of an unknown cause in 1861.



Gettysburg Railroad Station. View is from the east facing west at approximately 2:43 PM on Thursday, March 6th, 2008. The horizontal white lines mark where the old tracks leading to the station would have been in the 1860s. The tracks on the right would have continued approximately 500 yards to the west (away from the camera) to some warehouses.


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