Apr 27



The 32nd Massachusetts was organized at Fort Warren in Boston Harbor on November 25, 1861. It was mustered out on June 29, 1865, and its members formally discharged on July 11, 1865. During the war the unit had 144 officers and men killed or mortally wounded. 145 men and officers died of disease. Total 289. This view was taken from the northwest facing southeast at approximately 3:20 PM on Sunday, April 27, 2008.

On an overcast Sunday afternoon, the Gettysburg Daily visited the location where the 32nd Massachusetts Infantry regiment fought at Gettysburg on July 2, 1863. The 32nd Massachusetts fought on the south slope of the Stony Hill, which is located west and north of Rose’s Wheatfield. The unit’s monument is unique for being in the shape of a pup tent or “dog tent.” There is also a plaque among a cluster of rocks near the monument to the 5th Michigan Infantry Regiment behind which the surgeon of the 32nd Massachusetts established a field hospital.



The monument’s design was by S.C. Spaulding, a veteran who had served with the unit during the war. The cost for the monument was $500. It was dedicated in October, 1894. The pup tent represents the everyday life of the soldier. During attacks by George “Tige” Anderson’s Georgia Brigade against this position, smoke filled the ravine (low ground behind/south of the monument) between the Stony Hill (where the monument is located) and Rose’s Woods (background), and at times, the 32nd Massachusetts had a difficult time seeing the Confederates. This view was taken from the north facing south at approximately 3:20 PM on Sunday, April 27, 2008.



At Gettysburg the unit was part of Jacob Sweitzer’s (2nd) Brigade of James Barnes’ (1st) Division of the Fifth Corps. It was eventually placed on the south slope of the Stony Hill, fronting towards Plum Run and towards Rose’s Woods where its monument is now located. William Tilton’s 1st Brigade of the 1st Division was located to the right or west of the 32nd Massachusetts. During a lull in the fighting here, Corporal Oscar W. West received permission to take canteens a fill them in Plum Run. There is a car in the background just to the left of the monument. Plum Run is located just behind the car. This view was taken from the northeast facing southwest at approximately 3:20 PM on Sunday, April 27, 2008.



At one point in the fighting, Colonel George L. Prescott of the 32nd thought he had received an order to retire. He replied, “I don’t want to retire. I’m not ready to retire. I can hold this place.” For a while, he was able to back up his words. The 32nd Massachusetts went into action at Gettysburg with only 274 officers and men. 68 officers and men were casualties for a loss of 25 per cent. This view was taken from the southeast facing northwest at approximately 3:20 PM on Sunday, April 27, 2008.



Looking east along the line of the 32nd Massachusetts. The left flank marker of the regiment is the small marker to the east of the monument among the brown leaves. Rose’s Wheatfield is in the distant background. This view was taken from the west facing east at approximately 3:20 PM on Sunday, April 27, 2008.



The right flank monument of the 32nd Massachusetts and the left flank marker of the 22nd Massachusetts of Tilton’s brigade. The monument to the 110th Pennsylvania is in the left background. This view was taken from the north facing south at approximately 3:20 PM on Sunday, April 27, 2008.



Behind this cluster of rocks upon which the monument to the 5th Michigan Infantry Regiment is located, Z. Boylston Adams, a surgeon for the 32nd, established a field hospital. The glorified first aid station was just 30 yards behind the 32nd’s battleline. A plaque now marks this location on the rock to the right of the cluster. This view was taken from the southeast facing northwest at approximately 3:20 PM on Sunday, April 27, 2008.



A closer view of the rock that holds the 32nd Massachusetts field hospital plaque. This view was taken from the southeast facing northwest at approximately 3:20 PM on Sunday, April 27, 2008.



The plaque marking the location of Surgeon Adams’ field hospital was placed here in 1895, one year after their monument was erected. This view was taken from the southeast facing northwest at approximately 3:20 PM on Sunday, April 27, 2008.


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