Dec 22



The Shriver House was restored to its 1860s appearance in 1996 and is a privately run museum. It is located at 309 Baltimore Street. The Sunday pictures in this post will show some freezing rain, and a little snow that was falling. This view was taken facing west at approximately 7:45 AM on Sunday, December 21, 2008.

The Shriver House, located at 309 Baltimore Street was built in 1860. It was the home of George Washington Shriver, his wife, Henrietta (known as “Hettie” or “Nannie”), and their two daughters. The home was restored in 1996, and many consider a tour of the Shriver House one of the best ways to become educated about Gettysburg’s 1860s civilian life.



In 1860, George Washington Shriver (1837-1864) was 23 years old. He had been married almost five years, had two daughters, and a son, Jacob Shriver, who died less than a year after he was born. George Shriver decided to construct a house and saloon on Baltimore Street for himself and his family. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 7:45 AM on Sunday, December 21, 2008.



The 1860 federal census shows that George “Schriver” was “white,” and that he lived in the same dwelling and was part of the same family with Henrietta Shriver (1838-) born in Pennsylvania; Sarah L. Shriver (1856-) born in Pennsylvania; Mary M. Shriver (1857-) born in Pennsylvania. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 2:30 PM on Saturday, December 20, 2008.



The building on the far right in this picture was the home of James Pierce, father of “Tillie” Pierce.  The building between the Pierce House and the Shriver House did not exist in 1863.  It was constructed in the 1870s by James Pierce. The 1860 federal census did not list an occupation for George Shriver. His real estate had a value of $600, and his personal estate had a value of $2100. His total of $2700 did not place him in the Top 100 wealthiest residents of Gettysburg for 1860. He would have been somewhat farther down the list as number 100 had a total value of personal property and real estate of $4000. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 2:30 PM on Saturday, December 20, 2008.



In 1860 George Shriver paid $290 for a lot on the south side of Baltimore Hill. The property that he would develop would not only be his home, it would consist of a saloon and a bowling alley. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:30 PM on Saturday, December 20, 2008.



Of all the population centers in the area, Gettysburg’s citizens mostly traded with the merchants and businessmen of Baltimore. The Borough of Gettysburg’s business district naturally began to stretch towards what by 1860 would be the fourth largest city in the United States. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 2:30 PM on Saturday, December 20, 2008.



This wayside exhibit in front of the Shriver House shows photographs of George, Hettie, and their two children, Sarah, known as Sadie, and Mary, known as Mollie. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:30 PM on Saturday, December 20, 2008.



The enterprise was known as “Shrivers’ Saloon and Ten-Pin Alley.” The saloon was located in the cellar of the house. The bowling alley was an adjacent building located steps from the rear of the home and was 16 feet wide by 64 feet long. Those dimensions would provide enough room for two bowling lanes. The bowling alley no longer exists. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 7:45 AM on Sunday, December 21, 2008.



It is taking a very long time for repairs to be made to the side walk in the left of this photograph.  In the left of this view we are looking down Baltimore Street towards Cemetery Hill. The Civil War began in April, 1861, and that September, George joined Company C of Cole’s Maryland Cavalry regiment in first Emmitsburg, and then Frederick, Maryland. He would be promoted to Sergeant. Pennsylvania Cavalry units were not being recruited in the Gettysburg area at that time, and Company C was made up of 68 individuals from the Gettysburg area. It was nicknamed the “Keystone Rangers.” This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 7:45 AM on Sunday, December 21, 2008.



While the Keystone Rangers were patrolling, skirmishing, and fighting in Virginia and Maryland, the 10th New York Cavalry Regiment occupied Gettysburg from Christmas Eve 1861 until March 7, 1862. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 2:30 PM on Saturday, December 20, 2008.



When the 10th New York Cavalry, or “Porter Guards” first arrived in Gettysburg they were housed in the halls, schoolhouses, etc., until barracks were erected, and it moved into them. Some of the structures in which the 10th New York stayed included Shriver’s Saloon and the bowling alley. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 2:30 PM on Saturday, December 20, 2008.



When fighting broke out to the west of Gettysburg on the morning of July 1, 1863, Hettie Shriver thought it best to leave the town for her father’s house, the Jacob Weikert Farm, three miles south of Gettysburg on the Taneytown Road near the Round Tops. She also took a neighbor, fifteen year old Matilda Jane “Tillie” Pierce. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:30 PM on Saturday, December 20, 2008.



Instead of escaping the horrors of war, the Shrivers and Tillie Pierce located themselves in what would become a major treatment center for the wounded during the battle. Sometimes the artillery fire was so heavy, they had to shout to each other to hear. Hundreds of wounded, dying, and dead were brought to the Jacob Weikert Farm, and the Shrivers and Tillie Pierce helped take care of them. This view was taken facing west at approximately 2:30 PM on Saturday, December 20, 2008.



When the Shrivers returned to their Baltimore Street home on July 7, 1863, they discovered that Confederate Sharpshooters had occupied their home, and in places knocked out parts of the wall so that they could fire. One and possibly two of these sharpshooters were killed in the Shriver House. The red flag shows that the building was used as a hospital. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 2:30 PM on Saturday, December 20, 2008.



George Shriver returned to Gettysburg for four days during Christmas, 1863. He had been gone for almost two and a half years. He was captured in action on New Year’s Day, 1864 and was eventually sent to Georgia’s Andersonville Prison where conditions were very unhealthy. George died at Andersonville in August, 1864, of starvation and scurvy. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 7:45 AM on Sunday, December 21, 2008.



Henrietta Shriver (1836-1916) married Stone Cutter Daniel Pittenturff on July 19, 1866. His wife, Cynthia Powers Pittenturff (daughter of Gettysburg Granite Cutter Solomon Powers) had died in April, 1864. Henrietta and Daniel had two daughters. Henrietta left Gettysburg in the 1870s, and is buried in Glenwood Cemetery, Washington, D.C. This view was taken facing west at approximately 7:45 AM on Sunday, December 21, 2008.

See the following related posts:

Jacob Weikert Farm on April 5, 2008.
Gettysburg Diamond Christmas Lights on December 8, 2008.
Christmas Wreaths in the National Cemetery on December 9, 2008.
Some Christmas Decorations at the Nicholas Codori House on December 17, 2008.
Christmas Decorations at the Alexander Dobbin House on December 18, 2008.
A Couple of Christmas Decorations at the Henry Baugher House on December 19, 2008.
Christmas Decorations at the Gettysburg Academy on December 21, 2008.


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