Dec 17



The Nicholas Codori House, at 44 York Street, was built in 1786 and is constructed of the same brown fieldstone as is in the McPherson Barn. This view was taken facing north at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.

The Nicholas Codori House, like most of the historic houses in Gettysburg is decorated for Christmas. One of goals in the next week is to show as many of the decorations at these historic homes as we are able. The Codori House, now known as the Brafferton Inn, was built in 1786 by Michael Hoke and is the oldest occupied house in Gettysburg. It is located at 44 York Street.

In 1843, Nicholas Codori purchased the home from the Hoke family for $1600. Nicholas Codori had 11 children and a thriving business, and needed more room. He purchased the property on either side of the house, building a large carriage house at the back of the east side and adding his meat market on the west side.

The Codoris hid in the basement of the house during the Battle of Gettysburg, when the street fighting occurred in the town on July 1, 1863, bullets entered their home above them. For months after the battle the house served as the Catholic chapel since St. Francis Xavier, the Codori’s Catholic church, was full of wounded soldiers. The Codori family continued to live in the house until 1967, or for 124 years.



Nicholas Codori was born May 28, 1809 in Alsace, France. The 1860 census shows that he was “white,” a Butcher, and that he lived in the same dwelling and was part of the same family with Elizabeth Codori (1812-), born in Pennsylvania; Simon Codori (1845-), born in Pennsylvania; Charles Sopan (1846-), born in Holland. His real estate had a value of $10,000 and his personal estate had a value of $1000. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.



Codori’s total worth of $11,000, according to the 1860 census, made him the 37th richest person in the Borough of Gettysburg. The wealthiest person was George Swope, the President of the Gettysburg National Bank. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.



Codori purchased the building to the left (west) of his house for his butcher shop. This building is now occupied by the “Artworks” store. Below is a list of Butchers in Gettysburg, according to the 1860 Federal Census. George Codori is the brother of Nicholas Codori. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.

Gettysburg, Pennsylvania Butchers according to the 1860 Federal Census:

Bormuth, John (circa 1835-) (White) Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident in 1860
Codori, George A. (circa 1836-) (White) Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident in 1860
Codori, Nicholas (circa 1809-) (White) Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident in 1860
Degraft, Henry (circa 1801-) (White) Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident in 1860
Pierce, James (circa 1808-1896) (White) Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident in 1860
Pierce, James S. (circa 1836-) (White) Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident in 1860
Pierce, William H. (circa 1841-) (White) Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident in 1860
Sweeney, Harvey (circa 1812-) (White) Gettysburg, Adams County, Pennsylvania resident in 1860



On the Butcher list above is James Pierce (1808-1896), father of Matilda Jane “Tillie” Pierce, who wrote a well-known account of the battle and who lived on Baltimore Street. Harvey Sweeney owned the building now known as the Farnsworth House on Baltimore Street. This view was taken facing north at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.



Nicholas Codori was the wealthiest of the Gettysburg Butchers. As we stated, he was the 37th richest person in Gettysburg. His $11,000 tied him, wealth-wise, with lawyer, Evergreen Cemetery President, and Gettysburg Battlefield Memorial Association Founder David McConaughy. It also tied him with Wagon Hotel owner Conrad Snyder. James Pierce was the 69th richest, and Harvey Sweeney was the 80th richest person in town. The other butchers listed in the census were not in the Top 100. This view was taken facing north at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.



As Nicholas Codori prospered, he invested much of his money in real estate. He bought and sold several lots in the town, and farms in Straban Township. In 1854 he purchased the Cumberland Township Farm of Michael Clarkson, which was situated approximately a mile south of town along the Emmitsburg Road. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 4:30 PM on Tuesday, December 14, 2008.



The Codori Farm along the Emmitsburg Road would never be occupied by Nicholas Codori. It was a tenant farm, and its purpose was to raise cattle for the butcher, Nicholas Codori. The farm was in the center of Pickett’s Charge on July 3, 1863. This view was taken facing north at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.



At the time of the Battle of Gettysburg, the Nicholas Codori Farm on the Emmitsburg Road may have been occupied by the family of John Staub. This view was taken facing north at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.



The Brafferton Inn Bed and Breakfast has 18 guest rooms, including six suites. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.



When first built by Michael Hoke, this was a four bedroom house. It was expanded in 1815 by attaching a kitchen and a larger dining room. This view was taken facing north at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.



This house held services for the Catholic church until January, 1864. The Priest would be in one of the upstairs bedrooms, and the parishioners filled the upstairs rooms and were standing on the staircase. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.



You can see high quality indoor pictures of the Codori House at brafferton.com. This view was taken facing south at approximately 4:15 PM on Wednesday, December 17, 2008.

See the following related posts:

Sunday Sunrise at the Swope House on March 9, 2008.
Pickett’s Charge Battle Walk on July 25, 2008.
Willoughby Run Quarry on December 4, 2008.
Gettysburg Diamond Christmas Lights on December 8, 2008.
Christmas Wreaths in the National Cemetery on December 9, 2008.
More Willoughby Run/McPherson Ridge Quarries on December 15, 2008.


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