Nov 7

On Sunday morning, we took a walk along the Emmitsburg Road Ridge to take some pictures of the monuments and the trees in the area as the sun came up. Here is the Henry Spangler Farm, located below and west of the Emmitsburg Road. The trees behind the barn and the house are on Seminary Ridge. The snow covered Blue Ridge Mountains/South Mountain/Appalachian Mountains are in the background. The is a Virginia “worm fence” or “saw buck fence” on the left of the driveway, and a post and rail fence is located on the right side of the driveway. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

Approximately five inches of heavy, wet, snow came to the Gettysburg area on Saturday, October 30, 2011. For those visiting Gettysburg, Saturday was not a good day to be touring the battlefield in the driving snow. The snow also caused trees to fall on a monument and a cannon (witness tree). But on Sunday morning, the first snow of the season looked quite interesting as it contrasted with the leaves, many of which were still on the trees.

See the following related posts:

October Snowstorm Damage Part 1 on October 31, 2011
October Snow Near the Emmitsburg Road Part 1 on November 2, 2011
October Snow at Culp’s Hill on November 4, 2011
Gettysburg Witness Tree Damaged Cannon Carriage: October Snowstorm Damage Part 2 on November 5, 2011

On the east side of the Emmitsburg Road are artillery pieces marking the position of Batteries F&K Third United States Artillery commanded by Lieutenant John Turnbull. Big Round Top is in the left background above the Abraham Trostle Barn. The road behind the cannon is Sickles Avenue. The marker is to Brigadier General Andrew A. Humphrey’s Second Division of the Third Army Corps. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

On July 2, 1863, Turnbull’s Battery had one officer and eight men killed. 14 men were missing, and one man captured. 45 horses were killed, and four of the six 12 pounder Napoleons were captured by the Confederates. Those guns were later recaptured by the Union. The snow-covered Little Round Top is now visible in the left background. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

On the west side of the Emmitsburg Road is the monument to the 5th New Jersey Infantry Regiment. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

The 5th New Jersey had approximately 221 soldiers engaged during the battle. 18 were killed, 60 were wounded, and 16 were missing. Their 94 casualties were 43% the number of soldiers engaged. This view was taken facing west at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

Before the Battle of Gettysburg, thd 5th New Jersey was involved at the battles and campaigns of the Yorktown, Williamsburg, the Seven Days battles around Richmond, Malvern Hill, Second Manassas, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. This view was taken facing west at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

Following the Battle of Gettysburg, thd 5th New Jersey was involved at the battles and campaigns of the Wilderness, Spotsylvania (where they attacked the “Bloody Angle,” Cold Harbot and Petersburg. In November, 1864 they were consolidated with the 7th New Jersey Infantry Regiment. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

The 5th New Jersey Monument was dedicated on June 30, 1888. This view was taken facing west at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

We’ll continue to move south along the east side of the Emmitsburg Road near the monument to the 16th Massachusetts. The Klingel Farm builings are in the right background. This image was created facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

Looking north up the Emmitsburg Road past the monument to the 16th Massachusetts which was dedicated on October 8, 1885. The buildings to the right (east) of the Emmitsburg road are at the Codori Farm. The trees above the Codori Farm are in Ziegler’s Grove on Cemetery Ridge and in the National Cemetery on Cemetery Hill. This view was taken facing northeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

We have now reached the driveway leading from the Emmitsburg Road to the Henry Spangler Farm. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

The original structures on the farm were constructed circa 1820 by George Plank. The farm was purchased by Henry Spangler in 1862. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

The farm house was originally a rectangular log structure with a stone summer kitchen directly behind it. The house was altered circa 1880 when a brick second story was added to the summer stone kitchen and the new structure was attached to the log house. Board and batten siding were then added to the new farm house. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

The original barn was burned during the battle of July 2, 1863, and a new barn was rebuilt on its foundations. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

The second barn was struck by lightning in 1932 and was also destroyed. Again the barn was rebuilt and today a third structure stands on the original foundations. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

We’re still moving south along the Emmitsburg Road towards the Klingel Farm. The monument is to the 12th New Hampshire Infantry Regiment. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

This area had recently been planted as an orchard, but now most of those trees are gone. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

The monument to the 12th New Hampshire was dedicated on September 28, 1888. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

On the other (south) side of the Klingel House is the monument to the 11th New Jersey Infantry Regiment. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

The monument to the 11th New Jersey was dedicated on June 30, 1888. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 8:00 AM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.

One of the best books on Gettysburg’s monuments is this book by Licensed Battlefield Guide Fred Hawthorne. For ordering information, click here. This image was copied facing north at approximately 6:00 PM on Sunday, October 30, 2011.


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