Dec 10



The Honey Locust Tree which was supposedly standing in 1863, is still standing in the Gettysburg Soldiers’ National Cemetery four months after it was struck by lightning. This view was taken facing east at approximately 4:30 PM on Monday, December 8, 2008.

The Honey Locust Tree in the Gettysburg Soldiers’ National Cemetery is still standing, and the Sickles’ Witness Fence upon which it fell is still not repaired.

See our original post on the Honey Locust Tree Damage on August 10, 2008.

See our original post on the Sickles’ Witness Fence Damage on August 12, 2008.



And while the tree is surviving, the fence on which it fell that separates the National Cemetery from Evergreen Cemetery has still not been repaired. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 4:30 PM on Monday, December 8, 2008.



When the tree was struck by lightning on August 7, 2008, approximately 30 feet was toppled, and much of it landed on the fence. This view was facing north at approximately 4:30 PM on Monday, December 8, 2008.



This iron fence at one time surrounded Lafayette Park across the street from the White House. This view was taken facing east at approximately 4:30 PM on Monday, December 8, 2008.



Congressman Daniel Sickles murdered his wife’s lover, Philip Barton Key (son of Francis Scott Key) near the fence on February 27, 1859. Sickles was acquitted of the murder by temporary insanity. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 4:30 PM on Monday, December 8, 2008.



The fence was donated to the Gettysburg Battlefield Memorial Associationwas by a joint resolution of Congress on October 12, 1888 through the efforts of Congressman Daniel Sickles, supposedly so that he could “show the world how I got away with murder.” This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 4:30 PM on Monday, December 8, 2008.



The fence was originally located on East Cemetery Hill, but was brought to the Cemetery to replace the original gas-pipe fence that many felt did not look appropriate for such an important location. Hopefully this fence will look appropriate in the near future. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 4:45 PM on Tuesday, December 10, 2008.



Hopefully, the honey locust tree will show its leaves again next spring. This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 4:30 PM on Monday, December 8, 2008.

See our posts on the Soldiers’ National Cemetery:

The Confusing Gettysburg Address Memorial on May 16, 2008.
Memorial Day Weekend Flag Decorations on May 25, 2008.
National Cemetery Walk on July 14, 2008.
Gettysburg National Cemetery Christmas Wreaths on December 9, 2008.

See our previous posts on Gettysburg Witness Trees:

Pender Witness Tree Area on April 30, 2008,
Gibbon Witness Tree on May 27, 2008,
Honey Locust Tree Damage on August 10, 2008,
Sickles Witness Fence Damage on August 12, 2008,
McPherson Woods Witness Trees on August 16, 2008,
Arkansas Monument Witness Tree on August 27, 2008.
Farnsworth Charge Witness Tree on September 8, 2008.
Did the National Park Service Cut Down a Witness Tree? on October 19, 2008,
Sickles’ Witness Tree on November 10, 2008.
Abraham Lincoln Baltimore Street Witness Tree on November 19, 2008.
Henry Heth Wounding Tree Stump on November 28, 2008.
Culp’s Hill Witness Tree: Split by an Artillery Shell? on November 30, 2008.
Culp’s Hill Witness Tree: Photographed by M.B. Brady and Company on December 5, 2008.


About Us  •  Support  •  Archives  •  Subscribe  •  Creative Commons License