Apr 25

The Farmer’s Inn and Hotel in Emmitsburg, Maryland. James F. Gibson took this photograph probably in July, 1863 “where our special artist was captured,” July 5 1863. Some believe that the photograph was taken on July 5, 1863 as Alexander Gardner, James Gibson, and Timothy O’Sullivan were on their way to Gettysburg. Only Gardner may have been in Emmitsburg on July 5, 1863, however, since only one “special artist” was listed as captured. Gardner also had a son at Mount Saint Marys College. Alternative dates for this photograph taken by James Gibson may have been July 9-10, 1863 at Gibson and O’Sullivan were following the Army of the Potomac towards Virginia. At this time, the building was owned by Henry and Catherine Hoffman. This view was taken facing northwest at in July, 1863. It is courtesy of the Library of Congress.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Joseph E. Mieczkowski is the host for this Emmitsburg series. A resident of nearby Fairfield, Pennsylvania, Joe is a Civil War living historian and educator. Joe portrays Lincoln’s Secretary of War, Simon Cameron as well as Gettysburg resident, David Wills. In addition Joe is a Licensed Town Guide in Gettysburg. He is also the past President of the Gettysburg Civil War Roundtable.

Educated at Salem College, Salem, West Virginia and at Pennsylvania State University, Joe has been employed for over 30 years with the Social Security Administration. He has served in a variety of locations and assignments including 16 years as a manager and director in Washington D.C. Presently he is the Area Director in Harrisburg PA.

If you would like to contact Joe, click here to reveal his email address.

To see Joe Mieczkowski’s previous series on Gettysburg Idols click here.

In the first Emmitsburg post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Joe Mieczkowski shows us a historical Emmitsburg mural, the Toll House on the Frederick Road, and the area of the Great Emmitsburg Fire.

In today’s Emmitsburg post, Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Joe Mieczkowski shows us The Farmer’s Inn and Hotel, which is now known as the Emmit House, and the Doughboy statue in front of the Emmit House.

This map shows us the locations taken of the videos for the Gettysburg Idols series. Videos #1-#3 were taken in our previous post. Video #1 was taken at the Jubilee Shopping Center. Video #2 was taken near the Frederick Road Toll House. Video #3 was taken near the town square. Video #4 and #5 were taken at the Emmit House. This map was created facing north at approximately 6:00 PM on Friday, April 20, 2012.

Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Joe Mieczkowski is the host for this series on Emmitsburg. He is standing in front of the Emmit House, which was known at the time of the American Civil War as the Hoffman House or the Farmer’s Inn and Hotel. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

In Video #4 (Videos #1-#3 were seen in our previous Emmitsburg post) Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guide Joe Mieczkowski presents the Emmit House and discusses how Alexander Gardner and possibly his crew were captured here on July 5, 1863. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

The Emmit House is located at a road junction. The Waynesboro Road is on the right (north) of the structure, and the old Hagerstown Road is to the left (south) of the building. This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.
The third story to the structure was added in 1875. This image was taken by Gettysburg photographer Jacob Mumper. At this time, the building was known as the Emmit House and was owned by Adam M. Kalback and Ben D. Hostetter. This image, taken facing west in 1906, is courtesy of the Robert F. Gauss Sr. Collection and Robert F. Gauss Jr.

In 1919 when this image was taken, the structure was owned by the Widow Mary Kalback. It was known as Hotel Slagle. Notice the fountain in front of the building in this picture and the previous photograph. This image taken facing northwest is courtesy of the Robert F. Gauss Sr. Collection and Robert F. Gauss Jr.
By the time this photograph was taken in 1943, the fountain had been replaced with a statue of a World War I Doughboy. At this time, the building was owned by D. Luther and Treva M. Beegle. This image taken facing west by Marjory Collins (1912-1985) and is courtesy of the Library of Congress.

We think the tree in full bloom is very nice, but we would like to see more of the building from this angle. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

In 1875 when the third story was added, an extension to the structure was added to the rear (right/west). This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

Licensed Battlefield Guide Joe Mieczkowski is in front of the Emmit House, and in front of the Doughboy statue, which appears to be preparing to drop a grenade on Joe’s head. This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

In Video #5 Licensed Battlefield Guide Joe Mieczkowski is standing by the Doughboy statue in front of the Emmit House. He relates the story of Charles Francis Weakley, an Emmitsburg civilian who fought with the 12th Massachusetts Infantry at the Battle of Gettysburg. This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

The Doughboy statue was placed here in 1927. It was created by Ernest Moore Viquesney (1876-1946) of Spencer, Indiana who produced over one hundred of these doughboy statues. Approximately 140 are still in existence in 38 different states. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

Technically, the name of the statue is “Spirit of the American Doughboy.” The statue sold for $1,000 from the Spencer, Indiana factory, plus the base. Bases of other statues ranged from simple mounds of dirt to granite or marble.This view was taken facing north at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

This statue has a base and a plaque listing those from the Emmitsburg area who bravely served their country… This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

… even if they weren’t all white. This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

We’ll show you some other items in the front of the building. This view was taken facing northwest at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

Here’s the side of the front porch where people were sitting in the James Gibson photograph taken in July , 1863, and which is the first photograph of this post. This view was taken facing north at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

The plaque up front shows that the structure was constructed circa 1800. The original owner and builder was Robert L. Annan, who owned it until Jacob Bohn purchased the structure in 1816. This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

The site of the original well was rediscovered in 1989, and this brick enclosure was then constructed. This view was taken facing southwest at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

This sign giving some history is also out front. This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

The sign says that the current “architectural configuration is from 1879, even though all the primary source materials we were fortunate to acquire show it was four years earlier, 1875. This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.

Here’s the view that the doughboy statue has had since 1927, looking east along Main Street back in the direction of the Emmitsburg town square. This view was taken facing east at approximately 5:30 PM on Friday, March 30, 2012.
Joe Mieczkowski has issued this book on Jefferson Davis and His Cabinet. For ordering information click here.
Joe Mieczkowski has issued this book on Abraham Lincoln and His Cabinet. For ordering information click here.

To see other posts by Gettysburg Licensed Battlefield Guides, click here.

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