Gettysburg Daily

Some monuments at Gettysburg National Military Park have been moved or relocated from their original positions. Today we take a look at the monument to the 2nd Delaware Infantry Regiment, which was originally located in the Wheatfield (highlighted).Though this is one of the William Tipton photos for which we don’t have a decent digitized copy, you can still make out the observation tower on Big Round Top in the right background. This view was taken facing southeast circa 1906.

This map shows the original location of the 2nd Delaware Infantry monument (top right) and its current location on Brooke Avenue (bottom left).This map was created in a chair facing east on March 22, 2017.

We’re standing on the south side of the Wheatfield Road, looking into the Wheatfield. Winslow’s New York Battery can be seen in the right of frame.This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 5:45 PM on Monday, March 20, 2017.

Here’s a similar view, taken around 1900. The 2nd Delaware is highlighted. The 2nd Delaware monument was constructed in 1885 and dedicated in 1886. The 27th Connecticut and 2nd Delaware were the first monuments from John R. Brooke’s Brigade to be placed on the battlefield. Brooke’s Brigade participated in the counterattack of Caldwell’s First Division (2nd Corps) through the Wheatfield on July 2nd. They advanced through the Wheatfield onto a rise of ground today marked by Brooke Avenue.This view was taken at approximately 5:45 PM on Monday, March 20, 2017.

An approximate modern view. We’ve highlighted the original location of the 2nd Delaware monument.This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 5:45 PM on Monday, March 20, 2017.

Now we’ve walked into the Wheatfield. The gentleman in the navy jacket is standing at the original location of the monument.This view was taken facing southeast at approximately 5:45 PM on Monday, March 20, 2017.

The foundation stones for the monument are still here. When searching for this foundation in winter, look for the area of brush that’s difficult to mow around.This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:45 PM on Monday, March 20, 2017.

Before concrete was popular, most monuments in the park were set upon granite (stone) foundations/substructures.This view was taken facing west at approximately 5:45 PM on Monday, March 20, 2017.

The gentleman in the navy jacket marks the original position of the 2nd Delaware monument in the Wheatfield.This panoramic view was taken facing southeast to southwest at approximately 5:45 PM on Monday, March 20, 2017.

In 1909 the 2nd Delaware monument was relocated about 500 yards to the southwest, joining the rest of its brigade on Brooke Avenue. Brooke Avenue was surveyed and constructed in 1906 by the War Department, though the rest of the brigade’s monuments were placed in 1889 and 1890. The avenue opened to the public on April 1, 1907: “This part of the field has been very difficult of [sic] access heretofore. The proposed avenue is intended to remedy this difficulty.”This view was taken at approximately 5:45 PM on Monday, March 20, 2017.

“The legislature of Delaware passed an act giving authority to [the War Department] to remove the Second Delaware monument from the Wheatfield to the left of Brooke’s brigade, its position during the battle. This change was approved by the Secretary of War.” The 27th Connecticut kept its 1885 monument in the Wheatfield and erected another monument on Brooke Avenue to mark its advanced position. Perhaps the Delaware legislature didn’t want to fund another monument.This view was taken at approximately 5:45 PM on Monday, March 20, 2017.